NATURAL POOL

The Natural Pool is just that, a protected swimming hole filled by waves crashing over the slick rocks. You can swim and snorkel here, although the area is really not that big. The pool lies down a rugged road and is best reached by 4WD vehicle. You can navigate the area yourself, but the road is not well marked.

The best way to visit this attraction is on an organized 4WD tour, like the four-hour Natural Pool and Indian Cave Jeep Safari or the Aruba ATV Tour with a Natural Pool Swim. You can also visit the pool on horseback tours.

ARUBA'S DIVE

Aruba is famous for its excellent wreck diving, catering to divers of all levels. Sunken vessels range from tugboats to cargo ships, and even plane fuselages.

Lying between Arashi and Malmok, the Antilia is the Caribbean's largest wreck and one of Aruba's most popular dives. Snorkelers can also explore the shallow-water sections of this wreck. Other popular wrecks include the 76-meter former concrete freighter Jane Sea and the oil tanker Pedernales.

Coral reefs lace the island's leeward shore. Some of the best reef dive sites include Skalahein Reef; Plonco Reef; and Mas Bango Reef, which is also excellent for snorkeling. Those who prefer to stay dry can board the Atlantis Submarine to view marine life, coral formations, and shipwrecks.

BOCA PRINS

In Arikok National Park, near the Fontein Cave and Blue Lagoon, Boca Prins is a dramatic stretch of coast backed by massive sand dunes. Trade winds sculpt these shifting sands, and adventure seekers love to slide from their peaks.

At the narrow sliver of beach, crashing surf and soaring limestone cliffs create dramatic coastal vistas. Swimming here is too dangerous, but it's a great spot for a picnic, and you can descend the steps to the shore, sink your feet in the sand, and feel the spray of the salty surf on your face. Four-wheel drive vehicles are recommended.

ARIKOK NATIONAL PARK

Outdoor enthusiasts love exploring rugged Arikok National Park. Covering almost 20 percent of the island, the park features cacti-covered landscapes, caves, sand dunes, and unique rock formations. Large boulders adorned with Indian paintings make up the odd rock formation known as Ayó, and the Casibari Boulders, weathered by trade winds, are strewn amid dry scrub. You can walk the trails and steps ascending through the rocks for great views and photo opportunities. Arikok National Park also encompasses the wave-thrashed shores of the island's north coast. Wave erosion carved the Natural Bridge at Anicouri, which collapsed in 2005, but you can still see a smaller natural bridge here, and it's a great spot for a picnic. On the picturesque waterfront, the old stone walls of the Bushiribana Gold Mill Ruins are the remains of a 19th-century gold smelter. Parakeets, goats, lizards, snakes, and iguanas are just some of the creatures found in the park. Since the roads can be rugged, a 4WD vehicle is recommended- some sites can't be accessed via 2WD vehicles-but you can also explore on horseback and hike the many trails.